jakov's picture

License - Using in commercial software

I am very bad in reading licenses so I have to ask explicitly

Can I make with OpenTK a Commercial application which I will sell?
What do I need to include in About box in this case?
Is there anyhing else I should know for this subject (please, in plain english, vb or c language:)


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Inertia's picture

Can I make with OpenTK a Commercial application which I will sell?
Yes. No purchase or royalties required. However you use it at your own risk.

What do I need to include in About box in this case?
Credit in binraries is not mandatory, but very welcome. Leaving credit in source code intact is mandatory.

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and this is not legal advice.

objarni's picture

Leaving credit in source code intact is mandatory.

Since I am also using OpenTK professionally - could you elaborate on this point..? Exactly where should this credit be? In every source file using any type from OpenTK, or one file or where? It is quite unusual to release the source code in a commercial software product - so who is the intended audience for this?

Inertia's picture

Leaving credit in source code intact is mandatory.
As in do not remove (c) notices from files that belong to OpenTK itself.

so who is the intended audience for this?
People using OpenTK for derivative works, such as developing parts of it further in a different direction.

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and this is not legal advice.

objarni's picture

Fiddler: Leaving credit in source code intact is mandatory.
Inertia: As in do not remove (c) notices from files that belong to OpenTK itself.

Does this mean the OpenTK source code must be distributed together with the commercial product?

Inertia's picture

Does this mean the OpenTK source code must be distributed together with the commercial product?
No. But you're allowed to do it, if you "do not remove (c) notices from files that belong to OpenTK itself."

Please, take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.NET_Reflector before you ask any questions about copy protection. It's pretty much the same whether you ship a binary or source.

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and this is not legal advice.

the Fiddler's picture

The MIT license says two things:

  1. You may use, modify and redistribute OpenTK in any way you see fit (in whole, in parts, binary or source).
  2. There is no warranty that it will work and no liability should it fail to do so.

The license actually has to be redistributed with the software - there is no distinction between binary or source versions (The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.). To give you a concrete example, the Opera browser displays the licenses of several software modules in the "about" section, some of which have terms very similar to the license of OpenTK.

My opinion is that you will be 100% covered if you add this passage to your about box:
The Open Toolkit library is covered by the following license:
[copy and paste the license text]

But please consult a lawyer if in doubt.

Inertia's picture

"The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software."
So this applies also for binary distribution? Thought it only applies for source. Good thing I posted disclaimers below my statements :P

jakov's picture

What does it mean in a binary? Are the //comments part even included in release version of the program?

the Fiddler's picture

Yep, otherwise how would the disclaimer work? (no guarantees, don't sue the developers, etc)

At least, that's what I get from the about boxes of existing commercial software.

Edit: sorry, didn't see your post jakov.

Binary means compiled. Source means not compiled. You are probably interested in the first case for your software.

The point is that you should distribute the OpenTK license, whenever you use code found in OpenTK (this holds even if you compile this code into your own binaries).

objarni's picture

To sum up the situation for a commercial, binary-distributed (source code not included) program using OpenTK in some way (via DLL or using parts of the OpenTK source in the program):

1) It is enough to show the MIT License in the about box, beneath a text "The Open Toolkit library is covered by the following license:"
2) An alternative to (1) is including the MIT license in a textfile somewhere in the installation, and referring to this license from Help/About ("Parts of this program was developed using MIT license software. See License.txt in installation folder for details")
3) The OpenTK community encourages you to show the OpenTK logo somewhere in runtime, for example during boot of a game

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer and this is not legal advice.

Edit: updated to reflect Inertias points